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be a network like facebook or google. but what's striking and necessary to understand the way it manifests itself physically is that networks carry networks. you might have a global backbone company like a level three or a tata that own the strands of glass and that own the conduits that might run perhaps beside railroad tracks across the country. you might have another company, sort of a mid-sized network services company, one called hurricane electric, that might actually illuminate those strands of glass. they might own the light. ask and then you might have a goldman sachs or large law firm that buys bandwidth on that glass. so it's, you know, we often talk about b the information superhighway as if the network itself were the highway. i hike to think of it more -- i like to think of it more that a given network is a car chugging along the highway side by side with other networks because there's definitely a layering going on that's crucial to understanding the way in which the networks of the internet operate individually, on a global basis, but then, of course, have to interconnect i
. >> they will be here on tuesday probably discussing these things. still fighting google, there is an appeal. the next panel -- [talking over each other] >> from the library side, that is the access and these things are being challenged. you still think about that person, that 7-year-olds that wants the window to the world. >> i want to thank the distinguished panel for their contributions. [applause] >> thank you. >> now from the international summits of the book a panel titled copyright and the book, a conversation about authors, publishers and the public interest. it is about 50 minutes. >> good morning, everybody. line name is maria pallante and i am united states registrar of copyrights and director of the u.s. copyright office and i would like to say at the outset that for me this is a very wonderful privilege because as you may or may not know because of the long history of copyright law in the library of congress this jefferson building is quite literally the house that copyright bills. let me start by introducing briefly the distinguished . let me start by introducing briefly the distinguishe
expanding its publishing operations, the google settlement moving forward in different directions. those alone account for a substantial portion of publishing news. on the non-fiction side it was a very strong year. in particular we are seeing a lot of best of 2012 lists dominated by behind the beautiful forevers which was winner of the national book awards. we had robert caro's latest volume in his ongoing biography of lyndon johnson and andrew sullivan's are from the free which was recently published. >> host: hundred page compendium looking at different child-rearing examples of special needs children. those three books alone are substantial but are just the tip of the iceberg in terms of what is on for a nonfiction. >> bob minzesheimer, same question. >> it was a big year for dead presidents. you mentioned robert caro's fourth of probably a five volumes on lyndon johnson, just an incredible lack of reporting and writing, 20th-century american history. also the team of rivals published in 2005 is back on the best-seller list thanks to steven spielberg's movie lincoln. on our list was
angeles or a network like facebook or google but what is striking and to understand the way it manifests itself physically is that networks carry networks. you might have a global background company like a level level 3 that owns the strand of glass and owns the conduits like railroad tracks across the country. you might have another company perhaps midsize network services company like electric that might eliminate those strands of glass. they might own the light and and of many might have another company that might be a goldman sachs or large law firm that buys bandwidth on that glass. so we often talk about the information superhighway as if the network itself is a highway. i like to think of it more as the network, given network is a car chugging along the highway side-by-side with other networks because there is definitely a layering going on that's crucial to understanding the way in which the networks of the internet operate individually ,-com,-com ma on a global basis but then of course how they interconnect and specifically. >> host: is there any fear that messages or whatever i
, in the middle of a conversation, google something, it is a pain to even do that. should be listening in like a friend and realize you need a particular piece of information. he would be frustrated if it didn't immediately popped out because it should know what i need. >> host: all our thoughts are not factual things. some of them are things we would rather keep to ourselves? >> guest: the intelligence is going to grow gradually. search engines right now don't even really read all these documents, these search engine, google spiders crawled web and analyze documents based on their words, a little bit of conceptual analysis that basically not really reading for content. that is going to change. they will read billions of documents and millions of books and there's a lot of useful information embedded in the semantics of what is on there which is why they were written. the assistant should understand that and the fact that that is feasible shown by watson, people realize the information watson has in the jeopardy game was not hand coded into computer language. it actually read wikipedia and oth
economic forces, right? i love the technology revolution, i'm a google addict. they're also drivers of social and political consequences which are not quite so benign. the way i like to look at it, and this is a quote from peter orszag, is, you know, how he sees it is he said, look, the big drivers are probably these economic forces, but the issue is that particularly in the united states the politics instead of trying to mitigate these very powerful economic forces has exacerbated them. so even as you have these economic forces creating much, much more concentration at the very top, you expect politics to sort of try to so much that blow. social institutions to soften that blow. and instead it's been an accelerate rant. and to me, that seems just about right. so who are these super rich guys, and what do they think about the rest of us, and what impact do they have? i would say, you know, the way i would characterize them as a group -- this is sort of a global group -- is these are global alpha geeks. so they do tend to be. and this is a difference from a kind of, you know, downton
technology would make cities obsolete. and yet google, which of all the companies in the world should have access to the best long distance working technology, what do they do? they build the google plex so their workers can be right next to one another. silicon valley, right? practically the most famous geographic cluster in the world is also the industry which is the most technologically savvy. why is it that all this new technology far from making face to face contact in the cities that make it obsolete seems to be hypercharging our cities? this relatively rosy view is very unlike the new york of my youth. i was born in manhattan in 1967. i say that warily in the boston public library. [laughter] but i was. and these are two iconic images from my, from my youth. we could have similar images of new york -- of boston in the 1970s as well. the bottom image is gerald ford denying new york's request for a fiscal bailout. ford didn't literally tell new york to drop dead, but lots of people think he meant it and, indeed, it looked as if new york was very much headed for the trash heap of histo
and reporter for "usa today." .. publishing operations, the google settlement moving forward in different directions. those olympic first stage apportion of bush publishing news. on the nonfiction front is a very strong year. in particular receipt of the best of 2012 list dominated by the likes of catherine coos behind beautiful forever is the witch was the winner of the national book award. the ongoing biography of lyndon johnson and andrew solomon's fire from the tree, only recently published over 900 each companion he had the king of different child-rearing examples of special needs children. so these two books on a very substantial books, but they're the tip the iceberg of nonfiction. >> host: minzesheimer, same question. >> guest: it was a big year for dead presidents. she remember robert harris is the fourth of five on monday june 10, which was just an incredible act of both reporting and writing about a secret 20th century history. dirt since goodman spoke spoken a team of rivals in 2005 is back on the bestsellers list thanks to steven spielberg's movie, linking. these are two numb
-- >> there were no other reviews to the "washington post," washington monthly, if you google "strom thurmond's america" you will find some. and you should google it. [laughter] >> what's next? >> i don't know. i'm not sure that i just finished this once i'm still trying to figure it out. [inaudible] >> no, no. thank you all for coming out. it's been a real pleasure. [applause] >> we'd like to hear from you. tweet us your feedback, twitter.com/booktv. >> we are here on booktv on c-span2. we want in addition to author elizabeth ames was written a book with steve forbes, "how capitalism will save us: why free people and free markets are the best answer in today's economy." elizabeth ames, first of all, tell us about yourself and your personal expense, particularly when it comes to economics. >> okay. well, i've been a financial journalist, but i've also been on both sides of the press release. so i started as a journalist and had in my own pr business, and i have also done projects, other communication projects with clients, among them riding, co-authoring books. and basically i have worked wi
imagining at the moment, it constantly streams up the post -- [talking over each other] >> google and microsoft wanted to get rid of copyright but how can you sustain riders? they can't live on freeze. some of them can. >> partially why we are here. >> i you -- [talking over each other] >> the national endowment and humanities, the attitude to providing finance, publishing and books by copyright. >> we certainly -- for the people that produce literature, the people that produce history, perspectives. we are not in the business of making a llaw and we have an instinct -- supporting the concept of copyright and whether they should last 85 years or longer and what kind of access to digital capacities exist for books that are not being sold.
mexicos. do a google with his statement he'll come up. >> need more than just what is in the debates. >> thank you very much. yes? >> good afternoon. my -- actually it's not so much a question as it is a proclaimation that there seems to be a lot of peacemakers who have made very deep steps in the peace process at the beginning, and they held out for so very long, it seemed to me, and it really kind of went beyond gandhi's civil disobedience in into akind of melee, and i suppose that those people should -- are they worthy of a claim? or did that in fact happen? >> did -- you mean the opposition or -- >> with people who resisted without being violent. >> oh, yeah. there were a number of protesters in syria. this largely started out as peaceful protests. they were sprinkled with some militant elements but the regime as i mentioned earlier -- in syria it's a security state. and i've dealt with these guys. they come after me on the littlest things, and it's a convulsive push button response. so, when i want to place the blame for this thing escalating. peace negotiations can happen anyti
signings look like. >> i also made reference books and it's easier to google them look it up. i still like the feeling and i have three homes and there's a library in each one and that's where i work. i work at a computer. i like to type back in the 70s. in my house i have my house i have a little collection of drawings on the wall which i quite enjoy, a trying out aliphatic, which is one of those things that picasso did, where he cut his face in a few lines, like five lines. obviously very quickly and it's a miracle. so i have pictures of people who are better writers than i am who encouraged me to try harder. >> they looking over my shoulder saying do that again, father. >> speaking of doing it again for me to do a lot of rewriting? >> when i started the morning, i always change it. i can always think of ways to improve it. sometimes i'm lucky if that happens, but sometimes i read a couple chapters and bigots the wrong approach in the back and do it again. >> back to square one. >> back to square one. i do a lot of that. nowadays if i feel lazy, then i remember there's about 5 million pe
, and it is a great speech. it's worth googling and reading. >> evan? >> yeah, susan. >> could you comment on the solarium project in this context? >> yes. one of the great planning exercises of all time and a model for everything that followed was ike coming out of the truman administration had to figure out his strategy. and he put together, you know, he was -- ike was unafraid to put the smartest guys in the room. some presidents don't want to do that. ike welcomed debate. he would jump in himself. and so he organized a methodical process where people offered three options, basically a preemptive strike on the soviet union, a fairly aggressive rollback strategy and something that looked a lot like containment. and they aired these things. and at the end there's a famous quote from george ken nonwho was, of course, the author of "containment" and was running the containment task force, and he had a somewhat condescending screw of general eisenhower as a lot of the sort of smart guys did. but he said at the end of this meeting eisenhower, the president stands up and sharply summarizes exa
's worth googling to read. >> would you comment on the solarium project? >> one of the great planning exercising of all time, and a model for everything that followed was ike coming out of the truman administration had to figure out a strategy, and he put together, ike was unafraid to put smartest guys in the room. presidents don't want to do that. ike welcomed debate, jumped in himself, and so he organized a methodical process where people offered three options, basically, a preemptive strike on the union, a fairly aggressive rollback strategy, and another that looked like containment, aired these things, and at the end, there's a famous quote from george cannon who was, of course, the author of "containment," and he was running the containment task force, and he had a con -- condescending view, and he said at the end of the meeting, eisenhower, the president, stands up and sharply summarizes what nay were talking about for three days, gettings -- gets right to the heart of the matter, and cannon goes, wow, he's the smartest guy in the room. he department show the smarts until the ve
of the ipad and the iphone, and of google and a facebook and twitter, and you're faced with a federal government which currently runs at the pace of manual typewriter. [laughter] you have no serious -- in that sense we're told by people who are running a disaster we need more of your money to prop up a disaster. we can't reform. it's a bipartisan failure. now the last thing i want it talk about is how washington would have dealt with this. washington is the most important single american. we would not have won the american revolutionary war without him. we might well not have gotten a constitution without him and might not have been able to find a orderly system of self-government. we stand on his shoulders. and washington was very big on listening to people who knew what they were doing. hesp h i'm not against listening to people who know more than you do. it's listening to consult assistants who know less than you do but get paid for telling you things you feel secure because you paid someone else that fails. washington, for example, in a fight in the second trenton campaign, needs
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15